No, Tony, No! Don’t Marry Herr Grunlich!

But, it’s too late.

After his unannounced visit to the harbor pilot’s home, where Tony has fallen in love with the harbor pilot’s son, the adults have intervened. Both Tony’s father, and her young love’s father, have declared their romance foolishness, and tomfoolery, and Tony is brought home where she consoles herself by agreeing to marry Herr Grunlich.

I don’t trust Herr Grunlich. His speech is as gilded as his curled mutton chop whiskers. He reeks of falseness, and worse, deceit. He has tricked his way into the family, and his bride into obeying her father, and even the bride’s mother knows that future happiness is nebulous.

“Do you think she’ll be happy with him?” (she asks her husband as the nuptial carriage drives away.)

“Ah, Bethsy, she is at peace with herself, and that is the most solid kind of happiness we can achieve on earth.” (Part 3, Chapter 14)

Hmmm…sometimes, I think peace is overrated. I have sought it often in my life, and it has been a worthy goal. But, it is not without sacrifice. Peace brings with it a quiet blanket to wrap oneself in. Yet one is at the same time shrouded from excitement.

I fear Tony’s sacrifice will be worse than that. I fear her future is doomed.

(I am reading Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann for German Lit Month. It is a wonderful way to spend November nights.)

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8 thoughts on “No, Tony, No! Don’t Marry Herr Grunlich!”

  1. Oh! I know absolutely nothing about this book (though I have heard of it), but after glimpse no.2 I want to read it almost as much as I want my mornings to feel like those….

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    1. I like how you said, “glimpse no. 2” as that is what I want to give: little peeks into this novel as I go through it. It’s not too late to join me, and it’s not too hard to read… 😉

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    1. The post title only comes from my internal screams; I was shocked to read Tony agree to hspis manipulative hand in marriage. I haven’t read much German literature myself, in fact this would have to be the first German novel I can remember reading, but it is fascinating stuff. That’s one of the great things about the blogging world, how it can encourage you to go places you’ve never gone before.

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