My Third Graders’ Favorite Read Aloud Of 2014

I have read so many wonderful books to my class this year. We have touched on every genre, from my personal favorite, Flora and Ulysses, to Martin Luther King, Jr.’s biography. But the hands down favorite, even of my beloved rapscallions, is this piece of historical fiction from Laura Ingalls Wilder.
“What do you like about it?” I asked them, as I was truly surprised it was their favorite. (Even though it’s been one of my favorites for over thirty years.) And so they told me:
 
“I think it was cool how they were able to survive all the dangerous things that happened to them.” ~Natalie
 
“I like that it had a different ending than most books.” ~Zion
 
“It doesn’t tell you where they end up. You have to read more to find out.” ~Robert
 
“I loved it because it was full of action and very descriptive.” ~Cole
 
“I liked it because like Cole said, there’s a lot of action. And, my favorite part was the scream in the night with the panther screaming, and then the Indian shot it.” ~M. J.
 
“I like the prairie fire because everybody was panicking and getting water.” ~Michael
 
“I liked how Pa was so brave to go out at night when it was so dark and the scream was right under his feet.” ~Katherine
 
“I liked when Mr. Scott fainted down in the well, and Pa went down to get him when all the water was coming up.” ~Emily
 
“I liked when she talked about her life. Other books talk about other people’s lives, but she talked about her life. She’s telling it like she’s living it right now.” ~Michelle
 
“(I learned to) never give up no matter how bad it is.” ~Erjon
 
“If you’re complaining now, look at the people in the past.” ~Romaan
 
These smart children of mine. They know that a good book is beautiful writing, an interesting story, and lessons we can take away with us after reading it.
 
And to think they’re only eight years old.
Advertisements

24 thoughts on “My Third Graders’ Favorite Read Aloud Of 2014

  1. It sounds like you have a great class! I have to add this one to our list – I am compiling books for us to read together this summer. 🙂

    Like

  2. The comments on this book are great. I remember having read all of this series and loved it to death. Such good books. Especially like the comments of Romaan and Erjon. Thanks for sharing what these wonderful children thought.

    Like

  3. Little House on the Prairie is one of my favorites, too. Sounds like you've got a great class on your hands! This post definitely made me smile. =D

    Like

  4. I don't think I have read this book but all those statements you shared are humbling to read. I love it when kids have such honest opinions about books.

    Like

  5. I was introduced to the Little House books in 4th grade. We loved them. And, to be quite frank, any writer would do well to throw out the how-to bestsellers in favor of this post. There's a lot of wisdom here about what readers want!

    Like

  6. I love this post. I like hearing what children like about books. It's so spot-on.
    That said, I've never read these myself but wouldn't mind getting a copy.

    Like

  7. I love fiction of the prairie and have read a lot of Willa Cather and Louise Erdrich. I have been a little put off reading this series from what I've read of Ma's attitude towards Native Americans. I suppose you have to keep a sense of time and place when reading novels from earlier times, though.

    Like

  8. When I read Willa Cather, in high school, I found her boring beyond belief. Funny, since I loved the Little House books (all seven of them). I should pick up Cather's My Antonia again.

    As far as Ma's attitude toward the Native Americans, I was shocked reading this time around. I understand she was fearful of them, but what I never saw before was how the pioneers felt it was their rightful place; no one considered the Native Americans at all.

    Still, their courage is inspiring in light of how difficult it must have been to survive with no neighborhood, no stores, no doctors…

    Like

  9. Children are amazingly astute when it comes to literature. My classes have never failed to pick the pick over the film, the book over the play. They know what it is to listen, and absorb the story, better than I know myself.

    The series is a fabulous piece of American history, and they keep entertaining the generations to come. I suspect you might like them as well. 🙂

    Like

  10. It's so true, Linda, how they know what they want. Their little pieces of wisdom are worth recording, not only for myself but to see how the adults in blog-land enjoy them, too. Truths from the mouths of babes and all that…

    Like

  11. I think it would be wonderful to discover the books with your daughter. I know reading Harry Potter with my son allowed me much deeper enjoyment than if I had just read through them myself. Which I doubt I would have done. 😉

    Like

  12. It's funny that no matter how many times I read them, and it's been countless over my childhood and teaching years combined, they never disappoint. I look at them from new perspectives of course, but always enjoy the stories. As well as the lessons.

    Like

  13. I have many suggestions if you're looking for more books, Lindsey. Personally, I try to hit all genres at least once in order to expose them to as many books as possible in the year. But, the year is never long enough for all I want to read to my class!

    Like

  14. I loved these books so much as a child, I used to beg my mother to make me calico dresses (she did!). I am glad to know they span generations. And yes, smart kids!

    Like

  15. This makes my heart SO glad to hear that some of today's children like this book. I've felt it has been mostly forgotten and seen as a bit anachronistic (which is ironic since it IS historical fiction). It is even demeaned by some as racist, etc., etc. I still love it and think it has a lot to offer. Sounds like your kids think so too 🙂

    Like

  16. I had the same experience reading this as an adult – shocked at Ma's attitude toward Native Americans. Absolutely missed this as a child. I agree with Vintage Reading though that it needs to be read with a sense of the time and place in which it was written. This is true of many other works as well when they reflect the people of the times. Good points.

    Like

  17. Such a wonderful post with all those quotes from your students! I loved the Little House series when I was younger. I was sad that my daughter had no interest in them when she was a little girl, but maybe my granddaughter would like to read this one with me when she comes to visit in July.

    Have your summer break begun? Lincoln schools ended right before Memorial Day Weekend. So early!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s