Reading Plans for July, August, September

July:

August:

September:

And randomly dispersed throughout the next months until the end of January? Japanese literature, of course! Lest I forget about my own challenge. 😉

Please feel free to join us for any, or all, of the above reading plans. I’m so excited about reading these novels of which I’ve heard so much!

28 thoughts on “Reading Plans for July, August, September”

  1. Wow, THE THORN BIRDS…what a blast from the past. When did I read that – before 1993, I suppose. That's when I started keeping up with my books read. I'll think about joining you and Les. However, I may just listen to see what you guys think about a revisit all these years later. I see the new edition is introduced by Maeve Binchy. Sweet!

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  2. I know! Did you see this cover says “30 Year Edition”?! I know that I read it in high school, as it was first published in 1977. I'm looking forward to rereading it; both Les and I were discussing how much we wanted to read it (and, we also want to read Irving's Cider House Rules). So, we had to put it on the schedule. Hope that you enjoy reading either the book, or our thoughts, Kay.

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  3. It looks like you have a great bunch of books in the next few months.
    I should pick up some Dostoevsky too. I have to admit that my English lit major was very light on literature outside England and America. I really need to read some of the great Russians.

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  4. The Idiot was a strange one for me–I read 3/4 of it and then stopped. I just couldn't handle it anymore! I keep meaning to read that last bit. Someday. Enjoy your reread of Thornbirds. I have a distinct memory of reading that one while pacing back and forth with a baby in one of those Snuggly carriers. Great therapy for this frazzled mommy!

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  5. What a lovely list — so many classics I would love to read. I look forward to your thoughts on The Thornbirds. I read it in high school and absolutely loved it. I wonder what I would think of it now.

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  6. I always wanted a major in literature, but there wasn't time with the requirements for my BA in psychology and elementary education. I almost have enough classes for a Russian lit minor, though! 😉

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  7. Here's the problem for me: too much light reading is like too much junk food. Fun while it lasts but at the end of the bag? All you have is a stomach ache.

    However, I love your teasing of me. xo

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  8. Shelley, I hope that doesn't happen with me at the end of The Idiiot. Usually, I'm passionate about those “dead white guys” especially if they're Russian.

    It's funny how you associate Thorn Birds with a snugly; I do the same with Tartt's Secret History.

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  9. I read it in high school, too, and loved it then (much like I did Sho-gun as well). I hope this revisit is as satisfying as the first time around which I can't say holds true for all books.

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  10. Don't you have at least a vague idea of what you'll read? Maybe I'm weird that way, becoming compulsive as I age, but I don't want to waste a minute!

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  11. I think you're reading Black Rain for the War challenge, and I'm reading it for the JLC6, but the important thing is we're reading it together. I'm looking forward to sharing our thoughts together.

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  12. great selection of books ,I loved the Sagan when I read it years ago I ve brought two Irvings ready to read the fourth hand and until i and you ,all the best stu

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  13. I really enjoyed A Prayer for Owen Meany last year. Hope you do to.

    I struggled with The Idiot, but made it through to the end. A lot of craziness going on in that book!

    -Jay

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  14. Stu, I'm so looking forward to Bonjour Tristesse! I had to order it specially because it was unavailable at our libraries (of which we have three in our town) and all the local bookshops. But, it is in my hands at last. I was somewhat disappointed with In One Person, but I'm excited about A Prayer for Owen Meany.

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  15. I've heard some crazy things about The Idiot. I love Dostoevsky's writing, but I am a bit apprehensive about this novel after hearing so many 'strugged with it' comments.

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  16. You are so amazing to make plans like this! The very minute I come up with such a scheme, I want to read something different. Must be a late-life rebellion against the 'must reads' of school. :<)))

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  17. Ah, Nan, I have quite a bit of the rebellious spirit within me, too. (Haven't we talked before about the minute I'm told to do something is the minute I no longer want to do it?!) I guess in this case, though, that 'rebellion' is working for me because I no longer want to read what's on someone else's (i.e. a publisher) agenda. This Summer, I want to read for me.

    Now, which is worse, rebellion or selfishness? 🙂

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  18. I'm not sure of the exact year, but I know I read it when I was a newlywed. Must've been 1981 or 1982. I'm really excited about re-reading this book and I wonder if it holds up after all these years. I hope you can join us, Kay!

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  19. I must admit to quite a bit of joy in my selection of novels to read for the Paris in July 2. Bonjour Tristesse, Bel Ami and Sentimental Education all sound so thrilling to me. (The only other novel I've read by Flaubert is Madame Bovary, which I've read severl times.) I hope you have a chance to read Bonjour Tristesse so that we can chat about it together. Thanks for visiting me, Iris.

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