The Art of Forgetting (and Give-Away)

The winner, pulled on Friday, June 25, is Kay of My Random Acts of Reading! Congragulations!

Underneath almost unbearably banal similes, I found The Art of Forgetting to be an unexpectedly good story. Camille Noe Pagan takes the issue of traumatic brain injury and weaves it into the lives of two best friends, showing us the impact of such a condition on a lifetime of loyalty.

When Julia is hit by a taxi cab in New York City, on her way to lunch with her best friend, Marissa, neither of them fully understand the impact that it will have on their lives. Julia becomes forgetful, childish in many ways, and loses a filter when it comes to expressing her thoughts or feelings. But, she doesn’t forget a deep, underlying guilt she’s been carrying after giving Marissa advice almost a decade ago.

Marissa accepted that advice. And now she must accept the change in her friend, while finding acceptance for herself. Despite her mother’s critical spirit, or the attentions of Nathan, her long-time-ago boyfriend, Marissa knows that she has to find the job that makes her happy, and the right man for whom she is destined to be married.

The two friends learn to balance their needs with one another’s, and in so doing cause the reader to examine the following questions:  Is it fair to put one’s expectations on another? What happens when one sacrifices her heart’s desire for her friend’s wishes? Can mistakes in the past be corrected in the present?

Indeed. Swans will actually try to drown each other if they’re angry enough. People admire their beauty and their devotion, but they’re certainly not the animal whose social patterns we’d be wise to emulate. Unlike humans, they’re unable to learn the art of forgetting. (p. 205)

For certainly, to live successfully in this life, Pagan reminds us that we must acquire that skill.

The publisher is offering one copy to readers, U.S. and Canada only, please. Simply leave a comment to be entered into the drawing from which I will pull one name a week from today.

Find other thoughts about this book here:
Monday, June 6th: Luxury Reading
Tuesday, June 7th: Book Club Classics!
Wednesday, June 8th: Book Addiction
Thursday, June 9th: That’s What She Read
Friday, June 10th: Life in the Thumb
Monday, June 13th: Rundpinne
Tuesday, June 14th: The Brain Lair
Wednesday, June 15th: Book Hooked Blog
Thursday, June 16th: Library of Clean Reads
Monday, June 20th: Peeking Between the Pages
Tuesday, June 21st: BookNAround
Wednesday, June 22nd: Books, Movies, and Chinese Food
Thursday, June 23rd: 2 Kids and Tired
Monday, June 27th: Stiletto Storytime
Tuesday, June 28th: The Well-Read Wife
Wednesday, June 29th: Bookworm with a View
Thursday, June 30th: Unabridged Chick

18 thoughts on “The Art of Forgetting (and Give-Away)

  1. Adrienne, I'll add you to the list for the give-away.Sara, I imagined a different story line as well, thinking it would focus more on dancing and friendship. The brain injury brought up interesting issues I hadn't thought of before, much like reading STiLL ALiCE (although that issue was early onset Alzheimer's). Still, it makes me grateful for the memory I do have. As to my summer, I'm finally getting in the groove. It takes awhile for me to get used to the down time, then it takes awhile for me to gear up again come August! 😉 I'll be by to see how your summer is going.

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  2. Parrish, shall I add your name to the drawing? (Are you into books about women's friendships? :)Bina, that's an interesting term: "neuro novel". This book explores mostly the impact on friendship, but also a bit on identity. I think you'd be interested in it.

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  3. I think the cover on this one is really lovely. I'm interested in the whole storyline, but the brain injury aspect is very intriguing to me. I can't resist books that are about memory and all the permutations of that subject. So, drop my name in the hat. 🙂

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  4. Wonderful review, Bellezza! I love the premise of this book – how an accident changes things and the loyalty between friends and whether mistakes can be correctd. I also love the author's name – Pagan 🙂

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