This March I’m going to continue with reading through the Bible, and judging from the 635 page views (as of today) I can see that other people must be reading along with me. It’s never too late to jump in with the current month, and if you’re anything like me you might get behind once in awhile. That’s okay, the word is faithful and true, and it is always waiting for us.

I’m eagerly waiting for my box holding 20 copies of The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh for World Book Night. I didn’t know it when I chose it, but on the US World Book Night site I read that, “This book was a top recommendation in voting by last year’s book givers!” I can see why, as I’ve already read the first twenty pages at Institute Day on Friday, and I’m really excited about giving it away in April. After I read it this March.

I’ve begun Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson for Berkley Books. I think I’m going to have a lot to say about this, so come back in a week or so to read my full review of this book written by The Bloggess.

I’m hoping to read a few short stories for Irish Short Story month sponsored by Mel U at Reading Lives. I have the ever popular Maeve Binchy’s collection, The Return Journey, but I’d like to read more Irish writers such as Anne Enright, Emma Donaghue, and even Oscar Wilde.

I’m about a fourth of the way through House Rules by Jodi Picoult, and I love it! The story is mesmerizing, and children with Asperger’s, with autism, on the spectrum period, are so familiar to me with my job in education. I have such a heart for their struggles, and the struggles of their parents. How can we make everything right, with so many seemingly oppositional rules…

Penguin sent me The Collected Poems of Marcel Proust with an introduction and notes by Harold Augenbraum which I’m excited to read as a.) I’m never as good with poetry as Parrish Lantern is and b.) Arti of Ripple Effects and I are going to read Swann’s Way in April. Isn’t this a good way to get a taste of the feast to come?

By March 15 I’m supposed to have read the first half of Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray for the read along with Trish and Melissa. I think I better stop blogging now and begin. Now that every title is laid out in this post, I’m feeling a bit daunted!

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